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cancidas
09-22-2005, 03:34 PM
NTSB Identification: IAD05LA133
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 06, 2005 in Babylon, NY
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-161, registration: N8270M
Injuries: 3 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On September 6, 2005, at 1725 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-161, N8270M, was substantially damaged when it overran a parking lot during a forced landing to Robert Moses State Park, Babylon, New York. The certificated private pilot and two passengers sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local personal flight that departed Republic Airport (FRG), Farmingdale, New York, at 1711. A visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

The pilot provided a written statement, and was interviewed by telephone. He said that it was a "gorgeous, perfect day," and that he intended to fly along the Long Island coastline. The pilot completed the preflight, taxi, and before takeoff checks according to the checklist. He then departed Farmingdale, and climbed the airplane to 2,000 feet with no anomalies noted.

After leveling the airplane at 2,000 feet, the pilot encountered "a lot of roughness in the engine." The engine rpm fluctuated greatly, and the entire airframe vibrated. The pilot declared an emergency via radio to air traffic control at Republic Airport, and stated that he planned to return there.

The engine power continued to decrease, the airplane could not maintain altitude, and the windscreen became obscured by engine oil. The engine oil pressure gauge showed no pressure, and the oil temperature gauge was "as high as it could go." The pilot amended his plan, and elected to land in a parking lot at the Robert Moses Park.

The pilot selected a parking lot for landing due to the relative scarcity of cars parked there. One vehicle was positioned in the center of the lot. The pilot circled the lot in the descent to keep the landing area in sight, as the windscreen was obscured, and selected a ground reference point to ensure that he cleared the vehicle in the center of the lot during landing.

During the landing, the airplane cleared the vehicle, touched down, overran the lot, and collided with two rows of bushes before it came to rest against a sand dune. The right wing separated from the airplane during the accident sequence.

An FAA aviation safety inspector responded to the scene on the day of the accident, and the airplane was then moved to Republic Airport.

The pilot was issued a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land on June 1, 2005. He was issued a first class medical certificate in September 2004.

The pilot reported 60 hours of total flight experience, 55 hours of which were in make and model.

The airplane was examined at Republic Airport on September 8, 2005. Examination of the airplane revealed holes in the engine case in the area of the #1 exhaust tappet and the #3 exhaust tappet.

An examination of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the airplane's engine had accrued 7,069 total hours of flight time, and had accrued 2,771 total hours since major overhaul.

At 2153, the weather reported at Republic Airport included clear skies with 10 miles visibility. The winds were from 130 degrees at 10 knots. The temperature was 68 degrees Fahrenheit, and the dew point was 57 degrees Fahrenheit.

cancidas
09-22-2005, 03:34 PM
NTSB Identification: IAD05LA133
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 06, 2005 in Babylon, NY
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-161, registration: N8270M
Injuries: 3 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On September 6, 2005, at 1725 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-161, N8270M, was substantially damaged when it overran a parking lot during a forced landing to Robert Moses State Park, Babylon, New York. The certificated private pilot and two passengers sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local personal flight that departed Republic Airport (FRG), Farmingdale, New York, at 1711. A visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

The pilot provided a written statement, and was interviewed by telephone. He said that it was a "gorgeous, perfect day," and that he intended to fly along the Long Island coastline. The pilot completed the preflight, taxi, and before takeoff checks according to the checklist. He then departed Farmingdale, and climbed the airplane to 2,000 feet with no anomalies noted.

After leveling the airplane at 2,000 feet, the pilot encountered "a lot of roughness in the engine." The engine rpm fluctuated greatly, and the entire airframe vibrated. The pilot declared an emergency via radio to air traffic control at Republic Airport, and stated that he planned to return there.

The engine power continued to decrease, the airplane could not maintain altitude, and the windscreen became obscured by engine oil. The engine oil pressure gauge showed no pressure, and the oil temperature gauge was "as high as it could go." The pilot amended his plan, and elected to land in a parking lot at the Robert Moses Park.

The pilot selected a parking lot for landing due to the relative scarcity of cars parked there. One vehicle was positioned in the center of the lot. The pilot circled the lot in the descent to keep the landing area in sight, as the windscreen was obscured, and selected a ground reference point to ensure that he cleared the vehicle in the center of the lot during landing.

During the landing, the airplane cleared the vehicle, touched down, overran the lot, and collided with two rows of bushes before it came to rest against a sand dune. The right wing separated from the airplane during the accident sequence.

An FAA aviation safety inspector responded to the scene on the day of the accident, and the airplane was then moved to Republic Airport.

The pilot was issued a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land on June 1, 2005. He was issued a first class medical certificate in September 2004.

The pilot reported 60 hours of total flight experience, 55 hours of which were in make and model.

The airplane was examined at Republic Airport on September 8, 2005. Examination of the airplane revealed holes in the engine case in the area of the #1 exhaust tappet and the #3 exhaust tappet.

An examination of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the airplane's engine had accrued 7,069 total hours of flight time, and had accrued 2,771 total hours since major overhaul.

At 2153, the weather reported at Republic Airport included clear skies with 10 miles visibility. The winds were from 130 degrees at 10 knots. The temperature was 68 degrees Fahrenheit, and the dew point was 57 degrees Fahrenheit.

Art at ISP
09-23-2005, 06:57 AM
Correct me if I am wrong, but don't those engines have a max overhaul interval of 1800-2000 hours? That engine should have been totally overhauled within the past 800 hours. I wonder if that is a contributing factor...

I hope Nassau Flyers has a good excuse.

Art at ISP
09-23-2005, 06:57 AM
Correct me if I am wrong, but don't those engines have a max overhaul interval of 1800-2000 hours? That engine should have been totally overhauled within the past 800 hours. I wonder if that is a contributing factor...

I hope Nassau Flyers has a good excuse.

mirrodie
09-23-2005, 03:12 PM
pardon my ignorance, but how is it known if it was Nassau Flyers?

Also, was hte pilots first name charlie?

mirrodie
09-23-2005, 03:12 PM
pardon my ignorance, but how is it known if it was Nassau Flyers?

Also, was hte pilots first name charlie?

moose135
09-23-2005, 03:35 PM
pardon my ignorance, but how is it known if it was Nassau Flyers?
Also, was the pilots first name charlie?

According to the Newsday article the day after the crash, the pilot was Thomas A. Frey, age 22. The two passengers were Thomas A. Frey, Sr. 63, and Jan Voparil, 64, all of Huntington Station.

From the FAA N-number registry for N8270M:

Registered Owner:

Name NASSAU FLYERS INC
Street GATE 3 REPUBLIC AIRPORT
City EAST FARMINGDALE
State NEW YORK
Zip 11735

You can look up most any US registered aircraft at:
http://162.58.35.241/acdatabase/nnum_inquiry.asp

moose135
09-23-2005, 03:35 PM
pardon my ignorance, but how is it known if it was Nassau Flyers?
Also, was the pilots first name charlie?

According to the Newsday article the day after the crash, the pilot was Thomas A. Frey, age 22. The two passengers were Thomas A. Frey, Sr. 63, and Jan Voparil, 64, all of Huntington Station.

From the FAA N-number registry for N8270M:

Registered Owner:

Name NASSAU FLYERS INC
Street GATE 3 REPUBLIC AIRPORT
City EAST FARMINGDALE
State NEW YORK
Zip 11735

You can look up most any US registered aircraft at:
http://162.58.35.241/acdatabase/nnum_inquiry.asp