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Thread: Plane overshoots runway at Teterboro, lands in arrester bed

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    Moderator Matt Molnar's Avatar
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    Plane overshoots runway at Teterboro, lands in arrester bed

    A plane has overshot a runway while landing at TEB and gotten stuck in the arrester bed. No further details yet.
    Ladies and gentlemen, this is your captain speaking. We have a small problem.
    All four engines have stopped. We are doing our damnedest to get them under control.
    I trust you are not in too much distress. —Captain Eric Moody, British Airways Flight 9

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    Senior Member Zee71's Avatar
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    Yeah....I just heard of this as well on ABC news.

    http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?se...cal&id=7700932
    Mark
    Queens, NY

    My website: http://mbsphotography.smugmug.com
    My photos at: JetPhotos and ANet

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    Plane registration is N923CL. Shot a couple pictures as I drove past and intended to park and get up close. They were snappy in removing the plane. By the time I parked and walked over (around 4PM) it was already being towed away.









    Click for full version of panorama.

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    Administrator PhilDernerJr's Avatar
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    Surprised the EMAS didn't eat up the nosegear! Glad all are ok.
    Email me anytime at [email protected].

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    Senior Member Futterman's Avatar
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    Great shots, Mark!

    It's gotta be a real interesting sensation to run into an EMAS. I wonder how it feels.
    "My wife is an air traffic controller. I married her because I've always wanted to screw the FAA." - B. Wulle

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    Senior Member darlyn's Avatar
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    So what happens now? How long until the EMAS is replaced and the runway reopened?

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    Saw it happen live. G-IV landing on Runway 6 went a little too far and into the EMAS. The EMAS did it's job well and everyone exited the aircraft unharmed. AFAIK Runway 6 is still closed.

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    Senior Member cancidas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil D. View Post
    Surprised the EMAS didn't eat up the nosegear! Glad all are ok.
    that's kinda the point. no damage to airplanes or property and usually no injuries.
    it is mathematically impossible for either hummingbirds, or helicopters to fly. fortunately, neither are aware of this.

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    Moderator USAF Pilot 07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Futterman View Post

    It's gotta be a real interesting sensation to run into an EMAS. I wonder how it feels.
    I hope I never find out!!

  10. #10
    Administrator PhilDernerJr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cancidas View Post
    that's kinda the point. no damage to airplanes or property and usually no injuries.
    The goal is to slow the aircraft so it doesn't go BEYOND the EMAS and hit something like a building or a car. Most every EMAS video and post-crash photos I've seen almost always make the nosegear collapse. Maybe it was just slow and on a lighter plane in this situation?

    See some footage at 4:00...

    Email me anytime at [email protected].

  11. #11
    Senior Member darlyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by USAF Pilot 07 View Post
    I hope I never find out!!
    Judging from footage taken of passengers in that video's EMAS test, I'd say it's just a jolt, some minor trembling, and rapid deceleration.

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    Senior Member lijk604's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heeshung View Post
    Plane registration is N923CL. Shot a couple pictures as I drove past and intended to park and get up close. They were snappy in removing the plane. By the time I parked and walked over (around 4PM) it was already being towed away.
    Was listening to LiveATC, and the callsign was Gotham 92. That would make this aircraft part of Meridian Air Charter based in Teterboro.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Futterman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil D. View Post
    Most every EMAS video and post-crash photos I've seen almost always make the nosegear collapse. Maybe it was just slow and on a lighter plane in this situation?
    Actually, the nose gear is supposed to be protected so the aircraft can be "removed from the arresting system easily, with minimal effects". It just looks like it collapses because the aircraft sinks through to the bottom.

    I'd imagine it feels something like riding a bike through loose sand, except the pilots aren't even trying to power through.

    Any word on the current status of the EMAS at TEB? I'm curious to know how long it takes them to repair it. (Photos would be SUPER cool, Mark!)




    Brian
    "My wife is an air traffic controller. I married her because I've always wanted to screw the FAA." - B. Wulle

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    NTSB factual report
    http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?e...04X11133&key=1

    The PIC further stated that in the landing flare, the copilot announced the speed was ref plus 10 knots and the PIC reduced the throttles to idle power. At ref speed, just prior to touchdown, a gust of wind caused the airplane to "float up" approximately 15 feet above the ground, before descending back down to the runway. The PIC further stated that at no point did either pilot believe there was not adequate runway remaining to continue the landing. The airplane touched down at 120 knots and the copilot stated a red crew advisory system (CAS) message generated for ground spoiler deployment. Thrust reversers then deployed and braking began immediately, with activation of the anti-skid system. At that point the airplane was decelerating through 80 knots and the pilots still felt the airplane would stop on the remaining runway; however, the airplane departed the end of the runway at 40 to 50 knots. The airplane traveled about 100 feet into an engineered materials arresting system (EMAS), located immediately beyond the runway, and came to rest

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    Quote Originally Posted by NTSB
    ...the airplane departed the end of the runway at 40 to 50 knots.
    I'm very surprised to hear the speed was that high, especially when the Gulfstream barely used up half of the EMAS distance. I'd say without the EMAS the plane would've definitely gone through the fence and into Rt. 46.
    Last edited by heeshung; 11-02-2010 at 01:05 PM.

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