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Columnists

Buying for Flying: An Investment in the Sky

Posted June 9, 2016 by Erika Armstrong

“…My return on this investment is priceless.”

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Photo by Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren
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Education

AvGeek Lesson: Everything There Is To Know About Runway Numbers

Posted February 24, 2016 by Phil Derner Jr.

Do those runway numbers mean anything? They sure do! We explain it to you and offer a little trivia in the process.

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Columnists

NATs: Flying the North Atlantic Organized Track System

Posted February 23, 2016 by Ken Hoke

Each day, over 2000 aircraft fly across the Atlantic. Find out how pilots navigate and communicate on the North Atlantic Tracks!

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Sometimes, figuring out how to get inside the fence for the first time is the hardest part. Photo by Ben Granucci, NYCAviation
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Columnists

7 Steps to Become a Pilot

Posted August 12, 2015 by Erika Armstrong

“As strange as it seems, stepping into the thought process that you actually want to be a pilot, rather than having an abstract desire, is your first step.”

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Education

Over the Edge: How Safe Are La Guardia’s ‘Short’ Runways?

Posted May 19, 2015 by Phil Derner Jr.

For decades, La Guardia Airport has been known for its short runways. Are they truly safe for us to takeoff and land on?

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Columnists

What Happens Behind the Cockpit Door?

Posted March 18, 2015 by Erika Armstrong

Passengers often wonder what goes on behind the closed door of the cockpit. Ericka Armstrong provides a glimpse into what pilots are doing during each phase of flight.

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Education

The Evolution of Engine Starting: From Hand-Propping to Button Pushing

Posted March 6, 2015 by David J. Williams

For many of us, our first understanding on how to start an airplane was when Bugs Bunny started the engines of the “World’s Largest Airplane” in Hare Lift (FF to 2:04). With a simple push of a button, all of the radial engines were up and running. And as ridiculous as that was, in the […]

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Education

Pilot and Co-pilot: What’s the Difference?

Posted February 5, 2015 by Jeff Choi

This question is one of the greatest causes of frustration for a pilot speaking to non-pilots about what it is that they do.

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Education

Flying in Cargo Class: The Anatomy of an Air Freighter

Posted February 4, 2015 by Ken Hoke

As an airliner flies by, cargo and passenger jets look virtually the same.. Inside a freighter, though, it’s an entirely different experience.

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Education

Holding Up to Heavy Metal: What Airport Runways Are Made Of

Posted January 13, 2015 by Gabe Andino

A mile of runway can take you anywhere. We take a look beneath the surface to see how runways are engineered and maintained.

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Photo: Helen Cook/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0
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Education

De-Icing: Why Are They Spraying Our Jet?

Posted December 3, 2014 by Ken Hoke

If you’ve flown in cold weather, you have probably seen an aircraft being de-iced. Here’s why they were washing your airplane with slimy green goop.

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A Lufthansa A-319 gets de-iced. Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Aleksandr Martin
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Aviation News

How the Ice Fighting Technology on Your Plane Makes Winter Flying Safe

Posted November 6, 2014 by David J. Williams

Icing on baked goods is delicious. Icing on a plane can kill you. Unfortunately, many have died as a result, but the lessons learned have made preventive measures a piece of cake.

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Image courtesy Mathieu Neuforge, via Wikimedia Commons
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Columnists

Flying Through Clouds on the Ground: The Science of Fog

Posted November 5, 2014 by Adam Daum

Meteorology Columnist Adam Daum gives us a clear understanding of fog: what the different types are, what causes it, and how it affects aviation.

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The speed ring is highly visible on this 1932 Waco biplane, used by Texaco. (Photo by RuthAS)
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Aviation News

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About the History of Engine Cowlings

Posted October 9, 2014 by David J. Williams

Rarely is much attention paid to one of the most important design aspects of modern jet engines: The cowlings. Aviation safety expert David J. Williams explores the history and development of the modern engine enclosure.

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USAir Flight 5050 crashed at the end of La Guardia Airport's runway 31 after a rejected takeoff, killing 2.
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Education

Losing an Engine on Takeoff: Abort It or Floor It?

Posted September 25, 2014 by David J. Williams

Engine failure on takeoff. Yikes! David Williams teaches us how pilots deal with the frightening prospect and the training that goes into making sure everyone comes out alive.

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Inside the Washington DC ARTCC. Image courtesy Federal Aviation Administration
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Education

Beyond the Tower: The Controllers That Guide You the Rest of the Way

Posted August 28, 2014 by Eddie Trujillo

An air traffic controller takes us beyond the tower to see just how many steps go in to guiding your flight safely along.

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Education

Lesson in Safety: How Airlines Deal with Thunderstorms

Posted August 6, 2014 by Phil Derner Jr.

The summer months mean thunderstorms across the US. How do airlines cope with these disruptive weather forces? An airline dispatcher gives us an inside look.

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Airline News

“The Why” Behind Accidental Door Slide Deployments

Posted July 9, 2014 by Patrick Smith

An Emergency Slide Inflated into the Cabin of a United Airlines 737. What Went Wrong? Plus: Evacuation Etiquette, and Everything You Need to Know About Doors.

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Education

Why You Are Delayed: How Air Traffic Control Delay Programs Work

Posted June 17, 2014 by Phil Derner Jr.

Flight delays happen for many reasons. Airlines can impose delays on themselves, or when weather hits, delays are put into place by air traffic control.

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Panoramic shot of a thunderstorm near Denver Airport on June 4, 2014 (Photo: Paul Thompson, @FlyingPhotog on Twitter)
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Education

Why You Are Delayed: The Science Behind Thunderstorm Development

Posted June 9, 2014 by Adam Daum

Thunderstorms are one of the top causes of flight delays. Meteorologist Adam Daum delves into the science behind this powerful force of nature.

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