Aviation News

August 8, 2012

Alaska Airlines Flight Loses Cabin Pressure in ‘Catastrophic Electrical Failure’

An Alaska Airlines 737-400 (N772AS) on final approach to LAX. (Photo by Phil Derner)

An Alaska Airlines Boeing 737-400 made an emergency landing in California Wednesday morning after it suddenly lost cabin pressure during flight to Seattle.

Alaska Flight 539 from Ontario, Calif., made an emergency decent from 28,000 ft to 8,000 ft and diverted to San Jose, The Aviation Herald reported. First responders were told it was the result of a “catastrophic electrical failure.”

The plane’s transponder also failed, making it invisible to air traffic controllers.

While no one was injured, the plane is expected to remain out of service until the root of the failure can be determined.



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  • “While no one was injured, the plane is expected to remain out of service until the root of the failure can be determined.” Yah – Good thinkin’!

  • The last I checked, the Boeing 737 is not considered a “stealth” aircraft. If the transponder fails the aircraft does NOT become invisible to air traffic controllers. Rather, the aircraft becomes a “primary target” with no identifiable information, I.E. altitude, speed etc.