Aviation News

June 28, 2011

FAA Fines Boeing Over $1 Million for Failing to Fix 777 Oxygen Systems

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Written by: BNO News
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The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Monday said it will fine the Boeing Company for more than $1 million after the airline failed to correct a known problem in production and installation of the central passenger oxygen system in its 777 airliners.

Boeing 777 tail in house livery

(Photo by Boeing)

The FAA said it based its civil penalty on inspections of nine newly assembled aircraft between April and October 2010. Inspectors discovered that spacers in the oxygen delivery system distribution tubing on the aircraft were not installed correctly.

Improper installation of the system can result in the system not supplying oxygen to passengers should depressurization occur. “There is no excuse for waiting to take action when it comes to safety,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “We will continue to insist on the highest levels of safety from our aircraft manufacturers.”

Boeing has 30 days from the FAA’s enforcement letter to respond to the agency.

In June 2004, Boeing was forced to pay a civil penalty of $824,800 for the company’s alleged failure to maintain its quality control system on the 737, 747, 767, and 777 airplane programs. And in March and April of 2002, Boeing received a series of fines totaling more than $1.1 million for numerous FAA violations.



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