Aviation News

October 13, 2010

FAA Proposes $455K Fine Against Corporate Air for Operating Plane with Faulty Engine

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Written by: BNO News
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The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on Wednesday proposed a $455,175 civil penalty against Corporate Air for allegedly operating a Beech 1900C airliner when it was not in compliance with Federal Aviation Regulations.

The FAA alleges Corporate Air, which is based in Billings, Montana, failed to maintain the aircraft under the company’s general maintenance manual, which includes the Pratt & Whitney Canada maintenance manual for the aircraft’s turboprop engines.

According to the allegations by the FAA, that Corporate Air operated the aircraft on at least 80 flights in spite of continued evidence of excessive oil consumption by the right engine.

The FAA-approved aircraft and engine manuals call for post-flight inspection and repair of an engine experiencing excessive oil consumption. Corporate Air did not correct the oil consumption problem despite repeated inspections in which oil had to be added.

“Our aviation safety rules are designed to protect the flying public,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “We expect airlines to comply with these rules and will take enforcement action when they do not.”

“The safety of the passengers and crew must be the top priority for any operator,” said FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt. “All operators must comply with maintenance requirements.”

Corporate Air has 30 days from the receipt of the FAA’s enforcement letter to respond to the agency.



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