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July 30, 2010

FAA to Downgrade Mexico’s Aviation Safety Ranking, Banning Mexican Airlines from Codesharing and Service Expansion in US

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Written by: BNO News
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The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration is set to downgrade Mexico’s safety ranking, restricting its airlines from codesharing with U.S. carriers or expanding Mexican carriers service in the U.S., The Wall Street Journal reported on Friday.

According to the Journal, the decision is expected to be announced on Friday and was prompted by concerns about lax Mexican government oversight of the country’s carriers.

The newspaper said that Mexican airlines will be restricted from codesharing on routes flown in conjunction with American carriers, including Delta Air Lines and American Airlines after the downgrade from Category 1 to Category 2.



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